Study

Predation determines the outcome of 10 reintroduction attempts in arid South Australia

  • Published source details Moseby K.E., Read J.L., Paton D.C., Copley P., Hill B.M. & Crisp H.A. (2011) Predation determines the outcome of 10 reintroduction attempts in arid South Australia. Biological Conservation, 144, 2863-2872

Actions

This study is summarised as evidence for the following.

Action Category

Release captive-bred mammals into fenced areas

Action Link
Terrestrial Mammal Conservation

Release translocated/captive-bred mammals in areas with invasive/problematic species eradication/control

Action Link
Terrestrial Mammal Conservation

Release translocated mammals into fenced areas

Action Link
Terrestrial Mammal Conservation

Use holding pens at release site prior to release of captive-bred mammals

Action Link
Terrestrial Mammal Conservation

Use holding pens at release site prior to release of translocated mammals

Action Link
Terrestrial Mammal Conservation
  1. Release captive-bred mammals into fenced areas

    A study in 1998-2010 in a desert site in South Australia (Moseby et al. 2011) found that four of five mammal populations released into a predator-free enclosure and one population released into a predator-reduced enclosure survived, increased their distribution and produced a second generation, whereas two populations released into an unfenced area with ongoing predator management did not persist. After release into a fenced enclosure where red foxes Vulpes vulpes, cats Felis catus and rabbits Oryctolagus cuniculus had been eradicated, greater stick-nest rats Leporillus conditor, burrowing bettongs Bettongia lesueur, western barred bandicoots Perameles bougainville and greater bilbies Macrotis lagotis were detected for eight years, increased their distribution within five years and reproduced within two years. Numbats Myrmecobius fasciatus were only detected for three years and did not produce a second generation. Burrowing bettongs released into a fenced enclosure with cats and rabbits but no foxes survived and increased their distribution over at least three years and produced a second generation within two years. Greater bilbies and burrowing bettongs released into an unfenced area with some predator management did not survive to produce a second generation or increase their distribution. In 1998–2005, five numbats, 106 greater stick-nest rats (6 captive-bred individuals), 30 burrowing bettongs, 12 western barred bandicoots and nine greater bilbies (all captive-bred) were released into a 14-km2 invasive-species-free fenced area. Rabbits, cats and foxes were eradicated within the fenced area in 1999. All western barred bandicoots and greater bilbies, and some greater stick-nest rats (8 individuals) and burrowing bettongs (10 individuals) were put into a 10-ha holding pen before full release after a few months. All other animals were released directly into the larger fenced area. In 2004-2008, thirty-two greater bilbies and 15 burrowing bettongs were translocated to an unfenced area (200 km2) where invasive predators (cats and foxes) were managed with lethal controls and dingoes Canis lupus dingo were excluded by a fence on one side. In 2008, sixty-six burrowing bettongs were translocated to a 26 km2 fenced area which contained small cat and rabbit populations as a result of previous eradication attempts. Between 2000 and 2010, animals were monitored using track counts, burrow monitoring and radio-tracking.

    (Summarised by: Ricardo Rocha)

  2. Release translocated/captive-bred mammals in areas with invasive/problematic species eradication/control

    A study in 1998-2010 in a desert site in South Australia (Moseby et al. 2011) found that four of five captive-bred mammal populations released into a predator-free enclosure and one population released into a predator-reduced enclosure survived, increased their distribution and produced a second generation, whereas two populations released into an unfenced area with ongoing predator management did not persist. After release into a fenced enclosure where red foxes Vulpes vulpes, cats Felis catus and rabbits Oryctolagus cuniculus had been eradicated, greater stick-nest rats Leporillus conditor, burrowing bettongs Bettongia lesueur, western barred bandicoots Perameles bougainville and greater bilbies Macrotis lagotis were detected for eight years, increased their distribution within five years and produced a second generation within two years, but numbats Myrmecobius fasciatus were only detected for three years and did not produce a second generation. Burrowing bettongs released into a fenced enclosure with cats and rabbits but no foxes survived and increased their distribution over at least three years and produced a second generation within two years. Greater bilbies and burrowing bettongs released into an unfenced area with some predator management did not survive to produce a second generation or increase their distribution. In 1998–2005, five numbats, 106 greater stick-nest rats (6 captive-bred individuals), 30 burrowing bettongs, 12 western barred bandicoots and nine greater bilbies (all captive-bred) were released into a 14-km2 invasive-species-free fenced area. Rabbits, cats and foxes were eradicated within the fenced area in 1999. All western barred bandicoots and greater bilbies, and some greater stick-nest rats (8 individuals) and burrowing bettongs (10 individuals) were put into a 10-ha holding pen before full release after a few months. All other animals were released directly into the larger fenced area. In 2004-2008, thirty-two greater bilbies and 15 burrowing bettongs were translocated to an unfenced area (200 km2) where invasive predators (cats and foxes) were managed with lethal controls and dingoes Canis lupus dingo were excluded by a fence on one side. In 2008, sixty-six burrowing bettongs were released into a 26 km2 fenced area which contained small cat and rabbit populations as a result of previous eradication attempts. Between 2000 and 2010, animals were monitored using track counts, burrow monitoring and radio-tracking.

    (Summarised by: Ricardo Rocha)

  3. Release translocated mammals into fenced areas

    A study in 1998-2010 in a desert site in South Australia (Moseby et al. 2011) found that four of five mammal populations released into a predator-free enclosure and one population released into a predator-reduced enclosure survived, increased their distribution and produced a second generation, whereas two populations released into an unfenced area with ongoing predator management did not persist. After release into a fenced enclosure where red foxes Vulpes vulpes, cats Felis catus and rabbits Oryctolagus cuniculus had been eradicated, greater stick-nest rats Leporillus conditor, burrowing bettongs Bettongia lesueur, western barred bandicoots Perameles bougainville and greater bilbies Macrotis lagotis were detected for eight years, increased their distribution within five years and produced a second generation within two years. Numbats Myrmecobius fasciatus were only detected for three years and did not produce a second generation. Burrowing bettongs released into a fenced enclosure with cats and rabbits but no foxes survived and increased their distribution over at least three years and produced a second generation within two years. Greater bilbies and burrowing bettongs released into an unfenced area with some predator management did not survive to produce a second generation or increase their distribution. In 1998–2005, five numbats, 106 greater stick-nest rats (6 captive-bred individuals), 30 burrowing bettongs, 12 western barred bandicoots and nine greater bilbies (all captive-bred) were released into a 14-km2 invasive-species-free fenced area. Rabbits, cats and foxes were eradicated within the fenced area in 1999. All western barred bandicoots and greater bilbies, and some greater stick-nest rats (8 individuals) and burrowing bettongs (10 individuals) were put into a 10-ha holding pen before full release after a few months. All other animals were released directly into the larger fenced area. In 2004-2008, thirty-two greater bilbies and 15 burrowing bettongs were translocated to an unfenced area (200 km2) where invasive predators (cats and foxes) were managed with lethal controls and dingoes Canis lupus dingo were excluded by a fence on one side. In 2008, sixty-six burrowing bettongs were translocated to a 26 km2 fenced area which contained small cat and rabbit populations as a result of previous eradication attempts. Between 2000 and 2010, animals were monitored using track counts, burrow monitoring and radio-tracking.

    (Summarised by: Ricardo Rocha)

  4. Use holding pens at release site prior to release of captive-bred mammals

    A study in 1998-2010 in a desert site in South Australia (Moseby et al. 2011) found that after being kept in a holding pen, all four mammal populations released into an invasive-species-free fenced enclosure survived for eight years and bred. After being kept in a holding pen prior to release into a fenced enclosure where red foxes Vulpes vulpes, cats Felis catus and rabbits Oryctolagus cuniculus had been eradicated, greater stick-nest rats Leporillus conditor, burrowing bettongs Bettongia lesueur, western barred bandicoots Perameles bougainville and greater bilbies Macrotis lagotis were detected for eight years, increased their distribution range within five years and produced a second generation within two years. In 1998–2005, nine captive-bred greater bilbies, eight wild-born greater stick-nest rats, 10 wild-born burrowing bettongs, and 12 wild-born western barred bandicoots were translocated into a 14-km2 invasive-species-free fenced area. Rabbits, cats and foxes were eradicated within the fenced area in 1999. Animals were released into a 10-ha holding pen before full release after a few months. Between 2000 and 2010, tracks were surveyed annually along eight 1 km × 1 m transects.

    (Summarised by: Ricardo Rocha)

  5. Use holding pens at release site prior to release of translocated mammals

    A study in 1998-2010 in a desert site in South Australia (Moseby et al. 2011) found that after being kept in a holding pen, all four mammal populations released into an invasive-species-free fenced enclosure survived and bred. After being kept in a holding pen prior to release into a fenced enclosure, where red foxes Vulpes vulpes, cats Felis catus and rabbits Oryctolagus cuniculus had been eradicated, greater stick-nest rats Leporillus conditor, burrowing bettongs Bettongia lesueur, western barred bandicoots Perameles bougainville and greater bilbies Macrotis lagotis were detected for eight years, increased their distribution range within five years and produced a second generation within two years. In 1998–2005, eight wild-born greater stick-nest rats, 10 wild-born burrowing bettongs, 12 wild-born western barred bandicoots and nine captive-bred greater bilbies were translocated into a 14-km2 invasive-species-free fenced area. Rabbits, cats and foxes were eradicated within the fenced area in 1999. Animals were kept in a 10-ha holding pen before full release after a few months. Between 2000 and 2010, tracks were surveyed annually along eight 1 km × 1 m transects.

    (Summarised by: Ricardo Rocha)

Output references

What Works in Conservation

What Works in Conservation provides expert assessments of the effectiveness of actions, based on summarised evidence, in synopses. Subjects covered so far include amphibians, birds, terrestrial mammals, forests, peatland and control of freshwater invasive species. More are in progress.

More about What Works in Conservation

Download free PDF or purchase
The Conservation Evidence Journal

The Conservation Evidence Journal

An online, free to publish in, open-access journal publishing results from research and projects that test the effectiveness of conservation actions.

Read the latest volume: Volume 18

Go to the CE Journal

Discover more on our blog

Our blog contains the latest news and updates from the Conservation Evidence team, the Conservation Evidence Journal, and our global partners in evidence-based conservation.


Who uses Conservation Evidence?

Meet some of the evidence champions

Endangered Landscape Programme Red List Champion - Arc Kent Wildlife Trust The Rufford Foundation Save the Frogs - Ghana Bern wood Supporting Conservation Leaders National Biodiversity Network Sustainability Dashboard Frog Life The international journey of Conservation - Oryx British trust for ornithology Cool Farm Alliance UNEP AWFA Butterfly Conservation People trust for endangered species Vincet Wildlife Trust