Study

Assisted re-establishment of a resident pride of lions from a largely itinerant population

  • Published source details Hoare R.E. & Williamson J. (2001) Assisted re-establishment of a resident pride of lions from a largely itinerant population. South African Journal of Wildlife Research, 31, 179-182

Actions

This study is summarised as evidence for the following.

Action Category

Release translocated/captive-bred mammals in family/social groups

Action Link
Terrestrial Mammal Conservation

Use holding pens at release site prior to release of translocated mammals

Action Link
Terrestrial Mammal Conservation
  1. Release translocated/captive-bred mammals in family/social groups

    A study in 1997–1998 on a savanna estate in Zimbabwe (Hoare & Williamson 2001) found that a translocated lion Panthera leo family kept in a holding pen prior to release joined with immigrant lions and formed a new pride. A lioness was translocated with three cubs (one male, two female). Within 45 days, seven male lions were close by and the female mated with one of these. The male cub moved away and the pride then comprised the female and daughters with two adult male lions. A wild lioness joined the pride 1.7 months after release, but was killed by a snare after six months. After 12–13 months, the original lioness had three new cubs and her daughters each also had litters. Resident lions on the estate were eliminated in 1995. In January 1997, a lioness and three cubs were translocated from communal land to a holding pen and were released on the estate after 90 days. Lions were monitored through to May 1998 by radio-tracking and direct observation.

    (Summarised by: Melissa Chieffe )

  2. Use holding pens at release site prior to release of translocated mammals

    A study in 1997–1998 on a savanna estate in Zimbabwe (Hoare & Williamson 2001) found that a translocated lion Panthera leo family kept in a holding pen prior to release joined with immigrant lions and formed a new pride. A lioness was translocated with three cubs (one male, two female). Within 45 days, seven male lions were close by and the female mated with one of these. The male cub moved away and the pride then entailed the female and daughters with two adult male lions. A wild lioness joined the pride 1.7 months after release, but was killed by a snare after six months. After 12–13 months, the original lioness had three new cubs and her daughters each also had litters. Resident lions on the estate were eliminated in 1995. In January 1997, a lioness and three cubs were translocated from communal land to a holding pen and were released on the estate after 90 days. Lions were monitored through to May 1998 by radio-tracking and direct observation.

    (Summarised by: Melissa Chieffe )

Output references

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