Study

Efforts going to the dogs? Evaluating attempts to re-introduce endangered wild dogs in South Africa

  • Published source details Gusset M., Ryan S.J., Hofmeyr M., van Dyk G., Davies-Mostert H.T., Graf J.A., Owen C., Szykman M., Macdonald D.W., Monfort S.L., Wildt D.E., Maddock A.H., Mills M.G.L., Slotow R. & Somers M.J. (2008) Efforts going to the dogs? Evaluating attempts to re-introduce endangered wild dogs in South Africa. Journal of Applied Ecology, 45, 100-108

Actions

This study is summarised as evidence for the following.

Action Category

Release captive-bred mammals into fenced areas

Action Link
Terrestrial Mammal Conservation

Release translocated mammals into fenced areas

Action Link
Terrestrial Mammal Conservation

Use holding pens at release site prior to release of captive-bred mammals

Action Link
Terrestrial Mammal Conservation

Release translocated/captive-bred mammals in family/social groups

Action Link
Terrestrial Mammal Conservation

Use holding pens at release site prior to release of translocated mammals

Action Link
Terrestrial Mammal Conservation
  1. Release captive-bred mammals into fenced areas

    A study in 1995–2005 in 12 dry savanna and temperate grassland sites in South Africa (Gusset et al. 2008) found that translocated and captive-bred African wild dogs Lycaon pictus released into fenced reserves in family groups had high survival rates and bred successfully. Eighty-five percent of released animals and their wild-born offspring survived the first six months after release/birth. Released animals which survived their first year had a high survival rate 12–18 months (91%) and 18–24 months (92%) after release. Additionally, groups which had more time to socialise in holding pens prior to release had higher survival rates (data presented as statistical models). Between 1995 and 2005, one hundred and twenty-seven wild dogs (79 wild-caught, 16 captive-bred, 16 wild-caught but captive-raised, 16 “mixed” pups) were translocated over 18 release events into 12 sites in five provinces of South Africa. Animals were monitored for 24 months after release, and the 129 pups which they produced after release were monitored up to 12 months of age. Forty characteristics of the individual animals, release sites and methods of release were recorded, and their impact on post-release survival was tested.

    (Summarised by: Ricardo Rocha)

  2. Release translocated mammals into fenced areas

    A study in 1995–2005 in 12 dry savanna and temperate grassland sites in South Africa (Gusset et al. 2008) found that translocated and captive-bred African wild dogs Lycaon pictus released into fenced reserves in family groups had high survival rates and bred successfully. Eighty-five percent of released animals and their wild-born offspring survived the first six months after release/birth, Released animals which survived their first year had a high survival rate 12–18 months (91%) and 18–24 months (92%) after release. Additionally, groups which had more time to socialise in holding pens prior to release had higher survival rates (data presented as statistical models). Between 1995 and 2005, one hundred and twenty-seven wild dogs (79 wild-caught, 16 captive-bred, 16 wild-caught but captive-raised, 16 “mixed” pups) were translocated over 18 release events into 12 sites in five provinces of South Africa. Animals were monitored for 24 months after release, and the 129 pups which they produced after release were monitored up to 12 months of age. Forty characteristics of the individual animals, release sites and methods of release were recorded, and their impact on post-release survival was tested.

    (Summarised by: Ricardo Rocha)

  3. Use holding pens at release site prior to release of captive-bred mammals

    A study in 1995–2005 in 12 dry savanna and temperate grassland sites in South Africa (Gusset et al. 2008) found that captive-bred and translocated African wild dogs Lycaon pictus which spent more time in holding pens had a higher survival rate after release. Wild dog families that had more time to socialise in holding pens prior to release into fenced areas had a higher survival rate than groups which spent less time in holding pens (data presented as model results). Overall, 85% of released animals and their wild-born offspring survived the first six months after release/birth, Released animals that survived their first year had a high survival rate 12–18 months (91%) and 18–24 months (92%) after release. Between 1995 and 2005, one hundred and twenty-seven wild dogs (79 wild-caught, 16 captive-bred, 16 wild-caught but captive-raised, 16 “mixed” pups) were translocated over 18 release events into 12 sites in five provinces of South Africa. Individuals were kept in pre-release pens for an average of 212 days, but groups were given between 15 and 634 days to socialise in pens prior to release. Animals were monitored for 24 months after release, and the 129 pups which they produced after release were monitored up to 12 months of age. Forty characteristics of the individual animals, release sites and methods of release were recorded, and their impact on post-release survival was tested.

    (Summarised by: Ricardo Rocha)

  4. Release translocated/captive-bred mammals in family/social groups

    A study in 1995–2005 in 12 dry savanna and temperate grassland sites in South Africa (Gusset et al. 2008) found that translocated and captive-bred African wild dogs Lycaon pictus released in family groups into fenced reserves had high survival rates and bred successfully. Eighty-five percent of released animals and their wild-born offspring survived the first six months after release/birth. Released animals that survived their first year had a high survival rate 12–18 months (91%) and 18–24 months (92%) after release. Additionally, groups that had more time to socialise in holding pens prior to release had higher survival rates (data presented as statistical models). Between 1995 and 2005, a total of 127 wild dogs (79 wild-caught, 16 captive-bred, 16 wild-caught but captive-raised, 16 “mixed” pups) were translocated over 18 release events into 12 sites in five provinces of South Africa. Animals were monitored for 24 months after release, and the 129 pups which they produced after release were monitored up to 12 months of age. Forty characteristics of the individual animals, release sites and methods of release were recorded, and their impact on post-release survival was tested.

    (Summarised by: Ricardo Rocha)

  5. Use holding pens at release site prior to release of translocated mammals

    A study in 1995–2005 in 12 dry savanna and temperate grassland sites in South Africa (Gusset et al. 2008) found that translocated and captive-bred African wild dogs Lycaon pictus that spent more time in holding pens in groups had a higher survival rate after release. Wild dog families that had more time to socialise in holding pens prior to release into fenced areas had a higher survival rate than groups which spent less time in holding pens (data presented as model results). Overall, 85% of released animals and their wild-born offspring survived the first six months after release/birth. Released animals that survived their first year had a high survival rate 12–18 months (91%) and 18–24 months (92%) after release. Between 1995 and 2005, one hundred and twenty-seven wild dogs (79 wild-caught, 16 captive-bred, 16 wild-caught but captive-raised, 16 “mixed” pups) were translocated over 18 release events into 12 sites in five provinces of South Africa. Individuals were kept in pre-release pens for an average of 212 days, but groups were given between 15 and 634 days to socialise in pens prior to release. Animals were monitored for 24 months after release, and the 129 pups which they produced after release were monitored up to 12 months of age. Forty characteristics of the individual animals, release sites and methods of release were recorded, and their impact on post-release survival was tested.

    (Summarised by: Ricardo Rocha)

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