Study

Abundance, use of space, and activity patterns of white-faced sakis (Pithecia pithecia) in French Guiana

  • Published source details Vié J., Richard-Hansen C. & Fournier-Chambrillon C. (2001) Abundance, use of space, and activity patterns of white-faced sakis (Pithecia pithecia) in French Guiana. American Journal of Primatology, 55, 203-221

Actions

This study is summarised as evidence for the following.

Action Category

Detect & report dead primates and clinically determine their cause of death to avoid disease transmission

Action Link
Primate Conservation

Translocate (capture & release) wild primates from development sites to natural habitat elsewhere

Action Link
Primate Conservation

Reintroduce primates as single/multiple individuals

Action Link
Primate Conservation

Reintroduce primates into habitat where the species is present

Action Link
Primate Conservation

Conduct veterinary screens of animals before reintroducing/translocating them

Action Link
Primate Conservation

Reintroduce primates in groups

Action Link
Primate Conservation
  1. Detect & report dead primates and clinically determine their cause of death to avoid disease transmission

    A before-and-after trial in 1994-1995 in tropical forest near Petit-Saut dam, French Guiana found that most of the translocated white-faced sakis Pithecia pithecia survived for at least four months when dead sakis were examined to determine their cause of death along with other interventions. Two out of three translocated sakis survived for at least four months after release, one individual died after circa 22 weeks. One male died following a new world screwworm fly larvae Cochliomya hominivorax that developed under its radio-collar. Veterinary screens included blood and skin biopsy and general health checks. Three out of six translocated wild sakis where monitored over 41 weeks after their release, which took place one day after capture. Monkeys were captured at development sites by nets and tagged with radio transmitters prior to release as single individuals or as a group into habitat already occupied by resident sakis. The study does not distinguish between the effects of the different interventions mentioned above.

  2. Translocate (capture & release) wild primates from development sites to natural habitat elsewhere

    A before-and-after trial in 1994-1995 in tropical forest near Petit-Saut dam, French Guiana found that most white-faced sakis Pithecia pithecia that were translocated from a development area to natural habitat nearby along with other interventions, survived for at least four months. Two out of three translocated sakis survived for at least four months after release; one individual died after circa 22 weeks. Sakis were captured during the flooding of their original habitat by nets. Three out of six translocated wild sakis where monitored over 41 weeks after their release, which took place one day after capture. The translocated sakis integrated with resident individuals. Monkeys were tagged with radio-transmitters and underwent veterinary screens prior to release as single individuals or as a group into a habitat already occupied by the species. Dead sakis were investigated to determine the cause of death. The study does not distinguish between the effects of the different interventions mentioned above.

  3. Reintroduce primates as single/multiple individuals

    A before-and-after trial in 1994-1995 in tropical forest in French Guiana found that most of the translocated white-faced sakis Pithecia pithecia that were partly released as single or multiple individuals, along with other interventions, survived for at least four months after release. One individual died after approximately 22 weeks. The female and the male that were released as single individuals bonded after release until the male died due to a parasite infection. Before release monkeys were captured by nets, were tagged with radio transmitters and underwent veterinary screens. Three out of six translocated wild sakis were monitored for 41 weeks after their release. The cause of death of dead sakis was clinically determined. The study does not distinguish between the effects of the different interventions mentioned above.

  4. Reintroduce primates into habitat where the species is present

    A before-and-after trial in 1994–1995 in tropical forest in French Guiana found that most of the translocated white-faced sakis Pithecia pithecia that were released into habitat with resident sakis along with other interventions, survived for at least four months. Two out of three translocated sakis survived for at least four months after release and one individual died after approximately 22 weeks. The female bonded with one of the two released males. Three out of six translocated sakis were monitored for 41 weeks after release. Sakis were captured using nets, tagged with radio transmitters and were screened by vets before release. When dead sakis were detected, the cause of death was determined. The study does not distinguish between the effects of the different interventions mentioned above.

  5. Conduct veterinary screens of animals before reintroducing/translocating them

    A before-and-after trial in 1994-1995 in tropical forest near Petit-Saut dam, French Guiana found that two out of three translocated white-faced sakis Pithecia pithecia that underwent veterinary screens prior to release alongside other interventions, survived for at least four months. Three (two males and one female) out of six translocated sakis were monitored intensively for 41 weeks after release using radio-collars. Two of these survived for at least four months post-release, and one male died after 22 weeks due to a screwworm fly larvae infestation under his collar. Veterinary screens included blood and skin biopsy and general health condition checks. When dead sakis were detected, the cause of death was clinically determined. Sakis were captured at development sites using nets and released the next day as single individuals or as a group into primary rainforest habitat already occupied by wild resident sakis. The study does not distinguish between the effects of the different interventions mentioned above.

  6. Reintroduce primates in groups

    A before-and-after trial in 1994-1995 in tropical forest near Petit-Saut dam, French Guiana found that most translocated white-faced sakis Pithecia pithecia that were partly released as a group along with other interventions, survived over four months. Two of six translocated sakis survived over four months after release. Three individuals released as a group dispersed separately after release and one male of this group associated temporarily with a resident couple before becoming solitary. Only three translocated wild sakis were monitored over 41 weeks post-release, which took place one day after capture. Monkeys were captured by nets, radio-collared and underwent veterinary screens prior to release. Dead sakis were examined to establish their cause of death. One male died from a parasite infection. The study does not distinguish between the effects of the different interventions mentioned above.

Output references

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