Study

Recovery and release of an infant muriqui Brachyteles arachnoides, at the Caratinga Biological Station, Minas Gerais, Brazil

  • Published source details Nogueira C.P., Carvalho A.R.D., Oliveira L.P., Veado E.M. & Strier K.B. (1994) Recovery and release of an infant muriqui Brachyteles arachnoides, at the Caratinga Biological Station, Minas Gerais, Brazil. Neotropical Primates, 2, 3-5

Actions

This study is summarised as evidence for the following.

Action Category

Provide supplementary food for a certain period of time only

Action Link
Primate Conservation

Reintroduce primates into habitat where the species is present

Action Link
Primate Conservation

Reintroduce primates as single/multiple individuals

Action Link
Primate Conservation
  1. Provide supplementary food for a certain period of time only

    A study in 1994 in a tropical dry forest in the Caratinga Biological Station in Minas Gerais, Brazil found that an abandoned infant muriqui Brachyteles arachnoides that was retrieved, supplemented with food and then returned along with other interventions was reunited with its mother and re-joined the wild group. Twenty-seven hours after detection and removal of the infant, it was released in the vicinity of its mother, who retrieved it immediately. In addition to being fed milk and mashed apple, the 4-months old female infant muriqui was also given a blanket for warmth before being released again. Furthermore, some ectoparasites were collected for study. The mother answered to the infant’s cries and retrieved it immediately and rejoined the group. The study does not distinguish between the effects of the different interventions mentioned above. 

  2. Reintroduce primates into habitat where the species is present

    A study in 1994 in a tropical dry forest in Minas Gerais, Brazil found that an abandoned infant muriqui Brachyteles arachnoides that was removed from its natural habitat and then returned, along with other interventions, was retrieved by its mother and re-joined the wild group. Twenty-seven hours after detection of the infant, it was released near its mother who retrieved it immediately and re-joined the group again. The 4-month old female infant muriqui was removed from the forest ground and was given a blanket for warmth, fed with milk and supplementary food, and some ectoparasites were removed for study. The study does not distinguish between the effects of the different interventions mentioned above.

  3. Reintroduce primates as single/multiple individuals

    A study in 1994 in a tropical dry forest in Minas Gerais, Brazil found that that an abandoned infant muriqui Brachyteles arachnoides that was removed from its natural habitat and then returned as a single individual, along with other interventions, was retrieved by its mother and rejoined the wild group. Twenty-seven hours after detection of the infant, it was released close to its mother who retrieved it immediately. The 4-month old female infant muriqui was removed from the forest and was first given a blanket for warmth, fed with milk and food and some ectoparasites were removed for study. The mother answered to the infant’s cries and retrieved it immediately and then rejoined the group. The study does not distinguish between the effects of the different interventions mentioned above.

Output references

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