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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Soil erosion assessment on tillage and alternative soil managements in a Sicilian vineyard

Published source details

Novara A., Gristina L., Saladino S.S., Santoro A. & Cerdà a. (2011) Soil erosion assessment on tillage and alternative soil managements in a Sicilian vineyard. Soil and Tillage Research, 117, 140-147


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Soil: Plant or maintain ground cover in orchards or vineyards Mediterranean Farmland

A replicated, randomized, controlled study in 2005–2007 in irrigated vineyards in Sicily, Italy, found less erosion in plots with cover crops, compared to conventional tillage (without cover crops), between the vine rows. Soil erosion and aggregation: Less erosion was found in plots with cover crops, compared to plots with conventional tillage (0–61 vs 31–89 Mg soil loss/ha). Implementation options: In plots with cover crops, the least erosion was found in plots with permanent cover crops (Trifolium clover and Festuca grass species: 0–40 Mg soil loss/ha), and the most erosion was found in plots with temporary Vicia faba cover crops (12–61 Mg/ha). Methods: There were three plots (three vine interrows/plot; 2.2 x 3 m interrows) for each of four temporary cover-crop treatments (V. faba; V. faba and V. sativa; Triticum durum; or T. durum and V. sativa), two permanent cover-crop treatments (T. subterraneum, F. rubra, and Lolium perenne, or T. subterraneum, F. rubra and F. ovina), and three control plots (conventional tillage in the interrows, 3–4 times/year, 15 cm depth). Cover crops were sown in October. Temporary cover crops were tilled into the soil in April, but permanent cover crops were not tilled. The slope of the vineyard was 16%. Erosion was measured after each significant rainfall event (15 events in November 2005–October 2007) with sediment traps (Gerlach traps: 1 m diameter, 40 litres).

 

Water: Plant or maintain ground cover in orchards or vineyards Mediterranean Farmland

A replicated, randomized, controlled study in 2005–2007 in irrigated vineyards in Sicily, Italy, found that less water was lost as runoff from plots with cover crops, compared to plots with conventional tillage (without cover crops), between the vine rows. Water availability: Less water was lost as runoff from plots with cover crops, compared to plots with conventional tillage (35–48 vs 57 mm). Methods: There were three plots (three vine interrows/plot; 2.2 x 3 m interrows) for each of four temporary cover-crop treatments (V. faba; V. faba and V. sativa; Triticum durum; or T. durum and V. sativa), each of two permanent cover-crop treatments (T. subterraneum, F. rubra, and Lolium perenne, or T. subterraneum, F. rubra and F. ovina), and each of three control plots (conventional tillage in the interrows, 3–4 times/year, 15 cm depth). Cover crops were sown in October. Temporary cover crops were tilled into the soil in April, but permanent cover crops were not tilled. The slope of the vineyard was 16%. Runoff was measured after each significant rainfall event (15 events in November 2005–October 2007) with sediment traps (Gerlach traps: 1 m diameter, 40 litres).