Conservation Evidence strives to be as useful to conservationists as possible. Please take our survey to help the team improve our resource.

Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Field assessment of soil quality as affected by compost and fertilizer application in a broccoli field (San Benito County, California)

Published source details

Stamatiadis S., Werner M. & Buchanan M. (1999) Field assessment of soil quality as affected by compost and fertilizer application in a broccoli field (San Benito County, California). Applied Soil Ecology, 12, 217-225


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Crop production: Add compost to the soil Mediterranean Farmland

A replicated, randomized, controlled study in 1995 in a broccoli field in the Salinas Valley, California, USA, found similar broccoli yields in plots with or without added compost. Crop yield: Similar broccoli yields were found in plots with or without added compost (13–15 Mg/ha). Implementation options: In plots with added compost, similar broccoli yields were found with or without added fertilizer (13–15 vs 14–15 Mg/ha). Methods: There were four plots for each of three compost treatments (0, 22, or 44 Mg/ha). Fertilizer (165 kg ammonium nitrate/ha) was added to half (6.1 x 7.7 m) of each plot. The compost was made from green wastes (>30%), cow manure (>20%), spoiled hay (>15%), clay soil (>5%), and crop processing residues. Crops were harvested and weighed on 10, 14, and 17 November 1995.

Soil: Add compost to the soil Mediterranean Farmland

A replicated, randomized, controlled, study in 1995 in a broccoli field in the Salinas Valley, California, USA, found similar amounts of nitrate, pH levels, and carbon dioxide emissions in soils with or without added compost. Nutrients: Similar amounts of nitrate, and similar pH levels, were found in soils with or without added compost (3–10 vs 2 kg NO3-N/ha; pH 8.1–8.3 vs 8.1). Greenhouse gases: Similar carbon dioxide emissions were found in soils with or without added compost (soil respiration: 17–32 vs 63 kg CO2-C/ha/day). Methods: There were four plots for each of three compost treatments (0, 22, or 44 Mg/ha). Fertilizer (165 kg ammonium nitrate/ha) was added to half (6.1 x 7.7 m) of each plot. The compost was made from green wastes (>30%), cow manure (>20%), spoiled hay (>15%), clay soil (>5%), and crop processing residues. Soil samples were collected on 11 October 1995 (0–7.6 cm depth).

 

Water: Add compost to the soil Mediterranean Farmland

A replicated, randomized, controlled study in 1995 in a broccoli field in the Salinas Valley, California, USA, found similar amounts of water in soils with added compost, compared to soils without added compost. Water availability: Similar amounts of water were found in soils with or without added compost (17–18% vs 17% water by weight). Methods: There were four plots for each of three compost treatments (0, 22, or 44 Mg/ha). Fertilizer (165 kg ammonium nitrate/ha) was added to half (6.1 x 7.7 m) of each plot. The compost was made from green wastes (>30%), cow manure (>20%), spoiled hay (>15%), clay soil (>5%), and crop processing residues. Soil samples were collected on 24 October 1995 (0–20 cm depth).