Study

Influence of different manuring systems with and without biogas digestion on soil organic matter and nitrogen inputs, flows and budgets in organic cropping systems

  • Published source details Möller K. (2009) Influence of different manuring systems with and without biogas digestion on soil organic matter and nitrogen inputs, flows and budgets in organic cropping systems. Nutrient Cycling in Agroecosystems, 84, 179-202

Actions

This study is summarised as evidence for the following.

Action Category

Grow cover crops beneath the main crop (living mulches) or between crop rows

Action Link
Soil Fertility

Grow cover crops when the field is empty

Action Link
Soil Fertility

Amend the soil with manures and agricultural composts

Action Link
Soil Fertility
  1. Grow cover crops beneath the main crop (living mulches) or between crop rows

    An experiment in 2001-2005 on silty loam soil in Villmar-Aumenau, Germany (Möller 2009) found no changes in soil carbon or nitrogen when wheat Triticum aestivum was undersown with clover Trifolium spp. and grass (species not specified). Manuring and cover cropping treatments with various crops also had no effect. Trial 1 had eight treatments: (1-2) clover/grass ley, (3) wheat Triticum aestivum plus cover crops receiving farmyard manure (FYM) as slurry or effluents, (4) potatoes Solanum tuberosum receiving FYM and solid effluents, or silage maize Zea mays receiving FYM, (5) rye Secale cereale plus cover crops plus FYM, (6) peas Pisum sativum plus cover crops, (7) spelt T. aestivum ssp. spelta plus cover crops plus FYM and (8) wheat undersown with clover/grass ley plus FYM and solid effluents (wheat sown in February/March, cover crop sown at same time). Trial 2 included: (1) clover/grass ley, (2) potatoes plus solid effluents, (3) winter wheat plus liquid effluents, (4) peas, (5) winter wheat plus liquid effluents, (6) spring wheat plus solid effluents. All manuring treatments were applied before ploughing. Five soil samples were taken from each plot to 30 cm depth and measured soil nitrogen and carbon.

     

  2. Grow cover crops when the field is empty

    An experiment in 2001-2005 on silty loam soil in Villmar-Aumenau, Germany (Möller, 2009) found no obvious changes in soil carbon or nitrogen despite different cover crop and manure management. There were two trials. Trial 1 had eight treatments: (1-2) Clover/grass ley; (3) wheat Triticum aestivum plus cover crops receiving farmyard manure (FYM) as slurry or effluents; (4) potatoes Solanum tuberosum receiving FYM and solid effluents, or silage maize Zea mays receiving FYM; (5) rye Secale cereal plus cover crops plus FYM; (6) Peas Pisum sativum plus cover crops; (7) Spelt T. aestivum ssp. Spelta plus cover crops plus FYM, and (8) wheat undersown with clover/grass ley plus FYM and solid effluents. Trial 2 included: (1) clover/grass ley; (2) potatoes plus solid effluents; (3) winter wheat plus liquid effluents; (4) peas; (5) winter wheat plus liquid effluents; (6) spring wheat plus solid effluents. Which applications of slurry were digested or not were not specified. All manuring treatments were applied before ploughing. Five soil samples were taken from each plot to 30 cm depth and measured soil nitrogen and carbon.

     

  3. Amend the soil with manures and agricultural composts

    An experiment in 2001-2005 on silty loam soil in Villmar-Aumenau, Germany (Möller 2009) found no obvious changes in soil carbon or nitrogen under different manure and cover crop management. Available nitrogen increased when manures were digested before application (70 kg N/ha), compared to undigested manures (61 kg N/ha). There were two trials. Trial 1 had eight treatments: (1-2) clover/grass ley; (3) wheat Triticum aestivum plus cover crops receiving farmyard manure (FYM) as slurry or effluents; (4) potatoes Solanum tuberosum receiving FYM and solid effluents, or maize Zea mays receiving FYM; (5) rye Secale cereale plus cover crops plus FYM; (6) peas Pisum sativum plus cover crops; (7) spelt T. aestivum ssp. spelta plus cover crops plus FYM, and (8) wheat undersown with clover/grass ley plus FYM and solid manures. Trial 2 included: (1) clover/grass ley; (2) potatoes plus solid effluents; (3) winter wheat plus liquid effluents; (4) peas; (5) winter wheat plus liquid effluents; (6) spring wheat plus solid effluents. All manuring treatments were applied before ploughing. Five soil samples were taken from each plot to 30 cm depth and measured soil nitrogen and carbon.

     

Output references

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