Study

Actions

This study is summarised as evidence for the following.

Action Category

Head-start amphibians for release

Action Link
Amphibian Conservation

Create ponds for amphibians

Action Link
Amphibian Conservation

Restore ponds

Action Link
Amphibian Conservation
  1. Head-start amphibians for release

    A replicated, before-and-after study in 1985–1987 of 20 restored and created ponds near Aarhus, Denmark (Skriver 1988) found evidence of breeding by European tree frogs Hyla arborea a year after head-started metamorphs were released. In 1986, 17–21 males were heard calling in four ponds, but no females, eggs or tadpoles were recorded. In 1987, up to 50 males were heard calling in 13 ponds. Four egg masses were found in one pond and tadpoles in six ponds. One hundred and fifty egg masses were collected from a local wild population. Animals were captive-reared in hot houses. Over 6,000 metamorphs were released into nine created and 11 restored ponds over 10 km2 in 1985–1986.

     

  2. Create ponds for amphibians

    A replicated before-and-after study in 1984–1987 of nine created ponds on a new golf course near Aarhus, Denmark (Skriver 1988) found that breeding populations of common frogs Rana temporaria were established in six ponds and common newts Triturus vulgaris in four ponds. Common toads Bufo bufo were also heard calling in one pond from 1986. Common frogs had colonized eight of the new ponds by 1987, with 14–117 egg masses found in six of the ponds. Common newts were first recorded breeding in four ponds in 1987. After the development of a golf course in 1984, nine ponds were created over four years.

     

  3. Restore ponds

    A before-and-after study in 1985–1987 of head-started European tree frogs Hyla arborea released into 20 restored and created ponds near Aarhus, Denmark (Skriver 1988) found evidence of breeding a year after release. In 1986, 17–21 males were heard calling in four ponds, but no females, eggs or tadpoles were recorded. In 1987, up to 50 males were heard calling in 13 ponds. Four egg masses were found in one pond and tadpoles in six ponds. One hundred and fifty egg masses were collected from the nearest natural population. These were captive-reared in hot houses. Over 6,000 metamorphs were released into nine created and 11 restored ponds (over 10 km2) in 1985–1986.

     

Output references

What Works in Conservation

What Works in Conservation provides expert assessments of the effectiveness of actions, based on summarised evidence in synopses. Subjects covered so far include amphibians, birds, terrestrial mammals, forests, peatland and control of freshwater invasive species. More are in progress.

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