Study

Actions

This study is summarised as evidence for the following.

Action Category

Install barrier fencing along roads

Action Link
Amphibian Conservation

Install culverts or tunnels as road crossings

Action Link
Amphibian Conservation
  1. Install barrier fencing along roads

    A before-and-after study in 1987–1988 of a barrier fence and two amphibian tunnels in the Mittelgebirge region of West Germany (Meinig 1989) found that once an effective fence was installed, numbers of migrating amphibians killed on the road during the breeding migration decreased. Prior to the new fence numbers killed were 109/night, compared to just 20 in 1987 and 30 in 1988. Overall, 85% of amphibians recorded at the fence passed through the tunnels. The total number of individuals captured at the fence and surroundings during the spring migration were 2,432 in 1987 and 2,050 in 1988. Of 211 toads marked at the fence in 1987, 68% were recaptured at tunnel exits within five days. Two drain channels with metal grid roofs were installed in the road in 1981. A more effective fence of plastic fabric similar to wire mesh (1 m high) was installed at tunnel entrances and parallel to the road in 1987. Pitfall traps were set at each end of the fence and at tunnel exits.

     

  2. Install culverts or tunnels as road crossings

    A small, replicated study in 1987–1988 of two amphibian tunnels with barrier fencing in the Mittelgebirge region of West Germany (Meinig 1989) found that once an effective fence was installed, 85% of amphibians recorded used the tunnels and road deaths decreased. Prior to the new fence, numbers killed were 109/night, compared to just 20 in 1987 and 30 in 1988. Between 2,432 and 2,050 individuals/year were captured at the fence and surroundings during the spring migration, of which 85% used the tunnels. Of 211 toads marked at the fence in 1987, 68% were recaptured at tunnel exits within five days. Two drain channels with metal grid roofs were installed in the road in 1981. A more effective fence of plastic fabric similar to wire mesh (1 m high) was installed at entrances and parallel to the road in 1987. Pitfall traps were set at each end of the fence and at tunnel exits.

     

Output references

What Works in Conservation

What Works in Conservation provides expert assessments of the effectiveness of actions, based on summarised evidence in synopses. Subjects covered so far include amphibians, birds, terrestrial mammals, forests, peatland and control of freshwater invasive species. More are in progress.

More about What Works in Conservation

Download free PDF or purchase
The Conservation Evidence Journal

The Conservation Evidence Journal

An online, free to publish in, open-access journal publishing results from research and projects that test the effectiveness of conservation actions.

Read latest volume: Volume 17

Go to the CE Journal

Subscribe to our newsletter

Please add your details if you are interested in receiving updates from the Conservation Evidence team about new papers, synopses and opportunities.

Who uses Conservation Evidence?

Meet some of the evidence champions

Endangered Landscape Programme Red List Champion - Arc Kent Wildlife Trust The Rufford Foundation Save the Frogs - Ghana Bern wood Supporting Conservation Leaders National Biodiversity Network Sustainability Dashboard Frog Life The international journey of Conservation - Oryx British trust for ornithology Cool Farm Alliance UNEP AWFA Butterfly Conservation People trust for endangered species Vincet Wildlife Trust