Study

Actions

This study is summarised as evidence for the following.

Action Category

Raise awareness amongst the general public through campaigns and public information

Action Link
Amphibian Conservation

Captive breeding harlequin toads (Atelopus species)

Action Link
Amphibian Conservation

Captive breeding frogs

Action Link
Amphibian Conservation
  1. Raise awareness amongst the general public through campaigns and public information

    A study in 1999–2012 of the Amphibian Rescue and Conservation Project in Panama (Gratwicke 2012) found that a large audience was reached via a multi-media award-winning awareness campaign. The website, in Spanish and English, received approximately 50,000 new visitors annually. In addition, the project engaged approximately 5,000 Facebook fans and 1,500 Twitter followers. The network of supporters provided a resource for fundraising and recruitment of volunteers. The campaign also resulted in about 50 news stories about the project each year, a weekly blog and a documentary film. In addition, legislation was passed in 2010 declaring August 14th National Golden Frog Day in Panama. In 2009, there was a legal resolution to draft and implement a national action plan for the conservation of the amphibians of Panama.

     

  2. Captive breeding harlequin toads (Atelopus species)

    A replicated study in 2006–2012 of amphibians at two breeding facilities in Panama (Gratwicke 2012) found that the majority of the priority conservation species bred successfully in captivity. At one breeding facility, 10 of the 15 priority amphibian species collected from chytrid-infected areas in 2006 reproduced in captivity, with varying success rates. This included the Panamanian golden frog Atelopus zeteki. At a second facility, captive Limosa harlequin frog Atelopus limosus, Toad Mountain harlequin frog Atelopus certus and Pirre Mountain frog Atelopus glyphus reproduced successfully. The Panama Amphibian Rescue and Conservation project, launched in 2009, aimed to establish assurance colonies of species in extreme danger of extinction and to reduce impacts of the chytrid fungus.

     

  3. Captive breeding frogs

    A replicated study in 2006–2012 of amphibians at two breeding facilities in Panama (Gratwicke 2012) found that two undescribed species at risk of extinction and la loma treefrog Hyloscirtus colymba were not successfully raised to adulthood.

     

Output references
What Works in Conservation

What Works in Conservation

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