Study

Toad patrols: a survey of voluntary effort involved in reducing road traffic-related amphibian mortality in amphibians

Actions

This study is summarised as evidence for the following.

Action Category

Use signage to warn motorists

Action Link
Amphibian Conservation

Use humans to assist migrating amphibians across roads

Action Link
Amphibian Conservation
  1. Use signage to warn motorists

    A study in 1995 of 76 toad patrol projects, 44 with toad warning road signs in the UK (Froglife 1996) found that despite signs and human assistance in the spring some toads were still killed on the roads. Overall, 65% of patrols reported that up to 100 toads were killed on the road, 28% reported 100–500 were killed and 7% over 500 toads. Only 20% of populations were believed to be stable or increasing. A questionnaire survey of most of the known and established toad patrols was undertaken. Seventy-six replies were obtained.

     

  2. Use humans to assist migrating amphibians across roads

    A study in 1995 of 76 toad patrol projects in the UK (Froglife 1996) found that 20,000–39,000 toads were moved across roads in the spring by 71 patrols. The most frequent number moved by each patrol was 500–1,000 animals (28% of patrols). Despite human assistance, 65% of patrols reported that up to 100 toads were killed on the road, 28% reported 100–500 were killed and 7% over 500 toads. Many patrols reported that an ‘appreciable proportion’ of the total number of migrating toads were moved by humans. However, only 20% of populations were believed to be stable or increasing. Patrols involved an average of 90 person-hours, as they tended to have 1–3 volunteers/night (range: 1–14) for 11–20 nights (1–49) each lasting two hours (1–7 hours). Most patrols had been active for 3–10 years (49 of 53 patrols). Forty-four sites had toad warning road signs. A questionnaire survey of most of the known and established toad patrols was undertaken. Seventy-six replies were obtained.

     

Output references
What Works in Conservation

What Works in Conservation

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