Study

Captive-bred bush stone curlews do not take untreated horsemeat and oat baits, but do take food that has been dyed blue

  • Published source details Johnston G. & McCarthy P. (2007) Susceptibility of Bush Stone-curlews (Burhinus grallarius) to sodium fluoroacetate (1080) poisoning. Emu, 107, 69-73

Actions

This study is summarised as evidence for the following.

Action Category

Do birds take bait designed for pest control?

Action Link
Bird Conservation

Use coloured baits to reduce accidental mortality during predator control

Action Link
Bird Conservation
  1. Do birds take bait designed for pest control?

    A randomised, replicated and controlled study over eight days in Adelaide Zoo, Australia (Johnston & McCarthy 2007), found that eight bush stone-curlews did not consume untreated bait (consisting of 50-100g pieces of sun-dried horsemeat and dried oats) when also provided with their normal food (consisting of beef mince, fruit and ‘Woombaroo insectivore mix’ – a commercially available feed mix), which they continued to eat.

     

  2. Use coloured baits to reduce accidental mortality during predator control

    A replicated, randomised and controlled trial in Adelaide Zoo, South Australia (Johnston & McCarthy 2007), found that dyeing food (minced beef, fruit and ‘Wombaroo insectivore mix’ – a commercially available food mix) blue had no effect on its consumption by six captive bush stone-curlews Burhinus grallarius over a ten day period.

Output references

What Works in Conservation

What Works in Conservation provides expert assessments of the effectiveness of actions, based on summarised evidence, in synopses. Subjects covered so far include amphibians, birds, terrestrial mammals, forests, peatland and control of freshwater invasive species. More are in progress.

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