Study

In summer yellowhammers used both cropped and uncropped habitats, whereas in winter Wild Bird Cover was used more than all other habitats, in the UK

  • Published source details Stoate C. & Szczur J. (1997) Seasonal changes in habitat use by yellowhammers (Emberiza citrinella). Proceedings - Brighton Crop Protection Conference, Farnham, 1-3, 1167-1172.

Actions

This study is summarised as evidence for the following.

Action Category

Plant wild bird seed or cover mixture

Action Link
Farmland Conservation

Plant wild bird seed or cover mixture

Action Link
Bird Conservation

Provide supplementary food for birds or mammals

Action Link
Farmland Conservation

Leave headlands in fields unsprayed (conservation headlands)

Action Link
Farmland Conservation
  1. Plant wild bird seed or cover mixture

    A study of habitat use by yellowhammers Emberiza citrinella in 1993, 1995 and 1997 on a mixed farm in Leicestershire, UK (Stoate & Szczur 1997) found that in summer, yellowhammers used both cropped and uncropped habitats, including wild bird cover, and in winter wild bird cover was used more than all other habitats relative to its availability. In summer, wild bird cover strips (8 m wide) were used significantly more than wheat or field boundaries (2 m-wide), but less than barley. In winter, cereal-based wild bird cover was used significantly more than all other habitats and kale-based Brassica spp. bird cover was used significantly more than cereal and rape crops. A 15% area of the arable land was managed for game birds. Yellowhammer nests were observed for 1.5-2 hours when nestlings were 4-10 days old and 5-15 foraging trips per nest were plotted in May-June 1993 and 1995. A 60 ha area of the farm was also walked seven times in November-December and February-March 1997 and habitat use was recorded.

     

  2. Plant wild bird seed or cover mixture

    A study of habitat use by yellowhammers Emberiza citronella on a mixed farm in Leicestershire, UK (Stoate & Szczur 1997) found that in summer yellowhammers used both cropped and uncropped habitats including Wild Bird Cover, whereas in winter Wild Bird Cover was used more than all other habitats relative to its availability.  In summer, Wild Bird Cover strips (8 m wide) were used significantly more than wheat or field boundaries (2 m wide), but less than barley.  In winter, cereal-based Wild Bird Cover was used significantly more than all other habitats and kale-based Bird Cover was used significantly more than cereal and rape crops.  A 15% area of the arable land was managed for game birds.  Yellowhammer nests were observed for 1.5-2 hours when nestlings were 4-10 days old and 5-15 foraging sorties per nest were plotted during May-June 1993 and 1995.  A 60 ha area of the farm was also walked seven times in November-December and February-March 1997 and habitat use was recorded.

     

  3. Provide supplementary food for birds or mammals

    A study of habitat use by yellowhammer Emberiza citrinella in 1997 on a mixed farm in Leicestershire UK (Stoate & Szczur 1997), found that in winter supplementary feeding sites were used more than cereal and rape crops and in late winter more than wild bird cover. In early winter, cereal-based wild bird cover was used significantly more than all other habitats and supplementary feeding sites, kale-based wild bird cover and field boundaries were used more than cereal and rape crops. In late winter, supplementary feeding sites were used significantly more than all other habitats including wild bird cover. A 15% area of the arable land was managed for game birds and in winter grain was distributed along some hedges and supplied in hoppers at permanent feeding sites. A 60 ha area of the farm was walked seven times in November-December and February-March 1997 and habitat use was recorded.

     

  4. Leave headlands in fields unsprayed (conservation headlands)

    A study of habitat use by yellowhammers Emberiza citrinella in 1994 and 1995 on a mixed farm in Leicestershire, UK (Stoate & Szczur 1997) found that conservation headlands were not used significantly more than adjacent crops (1.0 vs 0.7 yellowhammers flushed). The outer tramline of each field was walked three times in June 1994 and 1995. Yellowhammers flushed from the conservation headland and equivalent area in the adjacent crop were recorded.

     

Output references

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