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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: The addition of artificial macrophytes in an attempt to improve water quality at Barton Broad, Norfolk, England

Published source details

Kelly A. (2006) The addition of artificial macrophytes in an attempt to improve water quality at Barton Broad, Norfolk, England. Conservation Evidence, 3, 44-46

Summary

Artificial macrophytes have been suggested as a means of improving water quality by providing zooplankton refugia. Plastic brushes provided a short term reduction in phosphates as they were absorbed by the periphyton growing on the brushes. They also provided a refuge for invertebrates. After two years, the brushes became colonised by sponges, which greatly reduced their long term usefulness as invertebrate habitat.