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Providing evidence to improve practice

Individual study: Ring-barking of Scots pine Pinus sylvestris trees to create standing deadwood on heathland at Great Ovens, Dorset, England

Published source details

Liley D. (2005) Ring-barking of Scots pine Pinus sylvestris trees to create standing deadwood on heathland at Great Ovens, Dorset, England. Conservation Evidence, 2, 123-124


This study is summarised as evidence for the intervention(s) shown on the right. The icon shows which synopsis it is relevant to.

Use ring-barking (girdling), cutting or silvicides to produce snags Bird Conservation

A small study on heathland at Great Ovens, Dorset, England (Liley 2005), found that one of two mature Scots pine Pinus sylvestris trees which were ring-barked around November 2000 had a great spotted woodpecker Dendrocopus major nesting hole excavated in it by July 2005. Both trees died, the excavated one leaving 10 m of standing deadwood whilst the second tree fell, leaving a stump 1.25 m high.