Study

Trial translocation of Gould's petrel Pterodroma leucoptera nestlings within existing breeding grounds on Cabbage Tree Island, New South Wales, Australia

Actions

This study is summarised as evidence for the following.

Action Category

Provide supplementary food for petrels to increase reproductive success

Action Link
Bird Conservation

Translocate petrels and shearwaters

Action Link
Bird Conservation

Artificially incubate and hand-rear seabirds in captivity

Action Link
Bird Conservation

Provide artificial nesting sites for burrow-nesting seabirds

Action Link
Bird Conservation
  1. Provide supplementary food for petrels to increase reproductive success

    A replicated, controlled study on Cabbage Tree Island, New South Wales, Australia, in 1995 (Priddel & Carlile 2001), found that the fledging rate of 30 Gould’s petrel Pterodroma leucoptera chicks provided with supplementary food was identical to that of control (unmoved, parent-fed) birds and not significantly different from translocated and hand-reared chicks (29/30 fed chicks fledged vs. 30/30 translocated chicks and 29/30 controls). Fed chicks were also heavier than both translocated and control chicks. Approximately 25 g of supplementary food was provided every three days, in addition to parent-provided food, starting at approximately three months old and continued until fledging. This study is also discussed in ‘Provide artificial nesting sites’, ‘Translocate individuals’ and ‘Artificially incubate and hand-rear birds in captivity’.

     

  2. Translocate petrels and shearwaters

    A replicated, controlled study on Cabbage Tree Island, New South Wales, Australia, in 1995 (Priddel & Carlile 2001), found that the fledging rate of 30 Gould’s petrel Pterodroma leucoptera chicks translocated from their burrows to artificial nests nearby and hand-fed was not significantly different from control (unmoved, parent-fed) birds (100% of translocated chicks fledging vs. 29/30 controls). Translocated chicks were also significantly heavier than controls. Gould’s petrels only nest in two gullies on the island, 150 m apart, but show such strong philopatry that there is very little interchange between the gullies. As well as increasing inter-breeding, this study acted as a test case, before a possible translocation to another island (see (3)). Chicks were moved before they emerged from burrows (and so could imprint on their surroundings), but as late as possible to minimise the amount of artificial feeding required. This study is also discussed in ‘Provide artificial nesting sites’, ‘Provide supplementary food to increase reproductive success’ and ‘Artificially incubate and hand-rear birds in captivity’.

     

  3. Artificially incubate and hand-rear seabirds in captivity

    A replicated, controlled study on Cabbage Tree Island, New South Wales, Australia, in 1995 (Priddel & Carlile 2001), found that the fledging rate of 30 hand-reared Gould’s petrels Pterodroma leucoptera moved from their burrows to artificial nests nearby was not significantly different from control (unmoved, parent-fed) birds or from chicks provided with supplementary food (100% of hand-reared chicks fledging vs. 29/30 fed chicks and 29/30 controls). Hand-reared chicks were also significantly heavier than controls, but lighter than supplementary-fed chicks. Hand-rearing consisted of approximately 25 g of food every three days. This study is also discussed in ‘Provide artificial nesting sites’, ‘Translocate individuals’ and ‘Provide supplementary food to increase reproductive success’.

     

  4. Provide artificial nesting sites for burrow-nesting seabirds

    A replicated, controlled study on Cabbage Tree Island, New South Wales, Australia, in 1995 (Priddel & Carlile 2001), found that the fledging rate of 30 Gould’s petrel Pterodroma leucoptera chicks translocated from their burrows to artificial nests nearby and hand-fed was not significantly different from control (unmoved, parent-fed) birds (100% of translocated chicks fledging vs. 29/30 controls). Nest burrows were of the type described in (4). This study is also described in ‘Provide supplementary food to increase reproductive success’’, ‘Translocate individuals’ and ‘Artificially incubate and hand-rear birds in captivity’.

     

Output references

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