Study

Impact of meadow restoration on northern lapwing Vanellus vanellus breeding in mixed farmland near Västerfärnebo, Västmanland, Sweden

Actions

This study is summarised as evidence for the following.

Action Category

Sow crops in spring rather than autumn

Action Link
Bird Conservation

Restore or create traditional water meadows

Action Link
Bird Conservation

Plant crops in spring rather than autumn

Action Link
Farmland Conservation

Restore or create traditional water meadows

Action Link
Farmland Conservation
  1. Sow crops in spring rather than autumn

    A replicated, controlled study between 1984 and 1994 in Västmanland, Sweden (Berg et al. 2009), found that northern lapwings Vanellus vanellus nested on spring-sown crops more than expected based on their availability, and on autumn-sown crops less than expected. However, hatching success on spring crops was lower than on autumn crops (29-50% for 1,236 nests on spring crops vs. approximately 85% for 27 nests on autumn crops). This study is discussed in more detail in ‘Restore or create traditional water meadows’.

     

  2. Restore or create traditional water meadows

    A before-and-after study in 1984-1994 in Västmanland, Sweden (Berg et al. 2002), found that there was no increase in northern lapwing Vanellus vanellus population in the study area despite an increase in the area of managed flood meadows from 163 ha to 530 ha over the study period (approximately 220 pairs in 1985 vs. 200 in 1994; range of 152-297 pairs). Both managed and unmanaged meadows were used less for nesting than expected based on their availability. However, average hatching success was significantly higher in meadows (78-90% for 54 nests in meadows), compared to spring-sown crops (29-50% of 1,236 nests). There were no differences between meadows and autumn sown crops or cultivated grassland (approximately 85% and 75% success respectively). Before 1984, the majority of meadows in the area were overgrown and abandoned.

     

  3. Plant crops in spring rather than autumn

    A replicated, site comparison study between 1984 and 1994 in Västmanland, Sweden (Berg et al. 2002), found that northern lapwing Vanellus vanellus nested on spring-sown crops more than expected based on their availability, and on autumn sown crops less than expected. However, hatching success on spring crops was lower than on autumn crops (29-50% for 1,236 nests on spring crops vs approximately 85% for 27 nests on autumn crops).

     

  4. Restore or create traditional water meadows

    A before-and-after study in 1984-1994 in Västmanland, Sweden (Berg et al. 2002) found no increase in northern lapwing Vanellus vanellus population in the study area despite an increase in the area of managed wet meadows from 163 ha to 530 ha over the study period (approximately 220 pairs in 1985 vs 200 in 1994, range of 152-297 pairs). Both managed and unmanaged meadows were used less for nesting than expected based on their availability. However, average hatching success was significantly higher in meadows (78-90% for 54 nests in meadows), compared to spring-sown crops (29-50% of 1,236 nests). There were no differences between meadows and autumn-sown crops or cultivated grassland (approximately 85% and 75% success respectively). Before 1984, the majority of meadows in the area were overgrown and abandoned. The meadows and arable fields became flooded from mid-April to mid-May in years with high spring flooding.

     

Output references

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