Study

Quantifying relative fishing impact on fish populations based on spatio-temporal overlap of fishing effort and stock density

  • Published source details Vinther M. & Eero M. (2013) Quantifying relative fishing impact on fish populations based on spatio-temporal overlap of fishing effort and stock density. ICES Journal of Marine Science, 70, 618-627.

Actions

This study is summarised as evidence for the following.

Action Category

Prohibit certain gear types

Action Link
Marine Fish Conservation

Establish long-term fishery closures

Action Link
Marine Fish Conservation
  1. Prohibit certain gear types

    A replicated, before-and-after study in 1996–2012 of four areas of seabed in the Kattegat, off Sweden/Denmark (Vinther & Eero 2013) found that a combination of areas where non-selective gear types were prohibited and long-term fishery closures resulted in a reduction in unwanted catch (likelihood of being caught and retained) on cod Gadus morhua by the Danish bottom fleet compared to before implementation. Across all areas, fishing impact (reported as a function of fish density, fishing effort and gear size selectivity) was reduced for all size groups of cod, by 60% in the period after management measures were introduced (2009–2011) compared to the impact before (2008; see paper for data). In addition, by area, the reduction in fishing impact was largest in areas subject to permanent or partial closures, but a decline in fishing impact was also found in areas outside of closures due to a general change to more selective gears. In contrast, in a seasonally closed area, fishing impact was estimated to have increased in 2009–2010 in relation to 2008 (see paper for data). In 2009, Sweden and Denmark introduced protected areas on historically important cod spawning grounds. The protected zone had four areas in which fishing was either completely forbidden or limited to specific selective gears (Swedish size sorting grid and Danish SELTRA codend with 300 mm mesh size in exit window) throughout part, or all, of the year. Annual changes in fishing impact were estimated by overlaying the spatial and temporal distribution of cod and fishing pressure. Analyses of cod distribution were based on time-series data from six research trawl surveys (between 20–80 stations/year spanning 1996–2012) in the first, third and fourth quarters of a year. Fishing effort data from the Danish fleet in the Kattegat derived from logbooks and satellite-based vessel monitoring systems were analysed for the period 2008–2011.

    (Summarised by: Natasha Taylor)

  2. Establish long-term fishery closures

    A replicated, before-and-after study in 1996–2012 of four areas of seabed in the Kattegat, off Sweden/Denmark (Vinther & Eero 2013) found that a combination of closed areas and areas limited to specific gears resulted in a reduction in unwanted catch (likelihood of being caught and retained) on cod Gadus morhua by the Danish bottom fleet compared to before implementation. Across all areas, fishing impact (reported as a function of fish density, fishing effort and gear size selectivity) was reduced for all size groups of cod, by 60% in the period after management measures were introduced (2009–2011) compared to the impact before (2008; see paper for data). In addition, by area, the reduction in fishing impact was largest in areas subject to permanent or partial closures, but a decline in fishing impact was also found in areas outside of closures due to a general change to more selective gears. In contrast, in a seasonally closed area, fishing impact was estimated to have increased in 2009–2010 in relation to 2008 (see paper for data). In 2009, Sweden and Denmark introduced protected areas on historically important cod spawning grounds. The protected zone had four areas in which fishing was either completely forbidden or limited to specific selective gears (Swedish size sorting grid and Danish SELTRA codend with 300 mm mesh size in exit window) throughout part, or all, of the year. Annual changes in fishing impact were estimated by overlaying the spatial and temporal distribution of cod and fishing pressure. Analyses of cod distribution were based on time-series data from six research trawl surveys (between 20–80 stations/year spanning 1996–2012) in the first, third and fourth quarters of a year. Fishing effort data from the Danish fleet in the Kattegat derived from logbooks and satellite-based vessel monitoring systems were analysed for the period 2008–2011.

    (Summarised by: Natasha Taylor)

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